The lost art of writing memos

Memo
Lucrezia Carnelos on Unsplash

In the old world, a memo (or memorandum, meaning “reminder”) communicated:

  • policies
  • procedures
  • related official business within an organization

A memo is a written form of content broadcasted to a large audience, rather than a 1:1 conversation. By in large, they’re unfocused, off-topic, and boring as hell. As a communication tool, they’re duds. Memos suck.

“Get the memo?”

“Oh, you didn’t get the memo?”

“You must’ve not gotten the memo.”

See what I mean?

In the new world, companies must maintain their culture, practices, and procedures among a distributed workforce. Memos need to make a comeback.

But, they need new branding. No more formal, high-brow language. No more “to whom it may concern” and “without the foretold withstanding.” That’s old-world stuff. Pre-Covid stuff.

In the new, post-Covid world, memos are the new whitespace. Leaders can leverage memos to build strong cultures, inspire others, and lead better. Leaders that hone the craft of writing memos can accelerate the growth of their organizations at light speed.

It’s time to fall back in love with the memo.

In the new, post-Covid world, memos are the whitespace where leaders can build strong cultures, inspire others, and lead effectively. Leaders that embrace the skill of writing memos can accelerate the growth of their organization faster and more efficiently than ever before.

It’s time to fall back in love with the memo.

More thoughts on writing, productivity, and leadership on my Twitter.

I’m the tall, friendly dude you met one time at the airport bar.